Mouldy Foods

Typically, when we think of mould and food we picture mould covered bread, or that fuzzy green stuff that covers fruit and veg when it has gone off. When we talk about mouldy foods here, it is not these gross, fuzzy mould covered foods, but rather foods that are sources or binders of mycotoxins.

Unfortunately, mouldy foods are very common. Because of the way we treat our soils when farming, we’ve created an environment perfect for the cultivation of mycotoxins. Farming chemicals such as glyphosate/RoundUp significantly increase the amount of toxins fungi in the soil disperse. The strongest moulds survive pesticide spray and antifungal treatment and in response to being sprayed, the moulds that don’t survive release more toxins.

Moreover, destructive factory farming methods – such as disrupting the animals’ hormones right before slaughter to gain more weight by feeding them mouldy feed – have further increased the level of mycotoxins in our food.

 

Platter of mouldy food

What’s troubling is that farmers will ensure their animals aren’t fed mouldy food until the days right before their slaughter. Mouldy feed makes cows extremely sick and can even lead to pregnant cows having miscarriages. Agricultural companies are spending ridiculous amounts of money to make sure their animals’ health isn’t impacted by mouldy food.

The scary thing is, these farms produce the conventional food that we see in the supermarket, buy and eat.

To reduce our exposure to mould, via our diet, we should be eating foods that are organic and rich in antioxidants, grass-fed protein, contain high-quality fats, responsibly sourced foods and those that are low in sugar.

Foods that are high in mould and should be avoided include:

• Corn
• Wheat
• Barley
• Rye
• Peanuts
• Sorghum
• Cottonseed
• Cheeses, including stilton and blue cheese
• Sour dairy products such as buttermilk and sour cream
• Alcoholic drinks such as wine, beer, rum, gin, brandy, whisky and cider
• Oats
• Fungi (mushrooms and truffles)
• Processed meats
• Fruit juice (and any other product that contains fast releasing sugars)
• Rice
• Nuts such as pistachios and brazil nuts
• Oil seeds
• Black pepper
• Dried fruits
• Figs
• Most coffee

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How to detox from a mould sensitivity

Removal of or a reduction in your exposure to mould is the first step to recovery. The majority of our mould exposure comes from poor indoor air quality, with exposure to water-damaged indoor environments being the largest contributor.

Here are some things you can do to minimise your indoor mould exposure:

  • Fix leaks as soon as possible.
  • Dry any damp materials affected by leaks as soon as possible.
  • Get rid of any carpets, tiles and any other absorbent or porous materials if they become mouldy.
  • Scrub mould off hard surfaces and make sure to dry the area completely.
  • Don’t paint over or cover up mouldy surfaces.
  • Ensure you have proper ventilation – avoid areas that are “stuffy”.
  • Keep air conditioning drip pans clean.
  • Keep indoor humidity between 30 and 50 percent.
  • Use air filters and purifiers/sanitizers.
  • Ensure the ground slopes away from building foundations, so that water does not enter or collect around the foundations.

Once you have improved your indoor environment, you can start to remove the toxins that have accumulated in your body.

Steps you can take to detox include:

  • Take high quality supplements that promote detoxification such as benzene clay, activated charcoal, cholestyramine powder and other binders that bind internal mycotoxins.
  • Supplement with glutathione (which is often depleted in toxin-related illnesses).
  • Test and treat for candida overgrowth –mould can lead to candida overgrowth.
  • Supplement with vitamin B12, methyl-folate, B6 and riboflavin to support methylation.
  • Avoid common mycotoxin containing foods.
  • Use infrared saunas.

If you’re one of the 28% of people in the world who have a genetic susceptibility to mould, you may be unable to remove the toxins that have accumulated in your body. Unfortunately, this means that you can help to stop the build-up of these toxins in your body, but you will have difficulty removing them.

In our next article, we’ll talk about mouldy foods.

Mould sensitivity – Do you suffer from it?

This post is the second instalment in our mould toxicity series, read the first post here.

The problem with determining if you suffer from mould sensitivity is the fact that its symptoms are often similar to those of autoimmune diseases. Often, its things like mould exposure that trigger inflammation in the body, worsening autoimmune diseases.

The Environmental Health Center – Dallas has created a checklist to determine if you have been exposed to mould and suffer from mould sensitivity. This checklist includes:

• Do musty odours bother you?
• Have you worked or lived in a building where the air vents were discoloured?
• Have you noticed water damage or discoloration on ceilings or elsewhere?
• Has your home been flooded?
• Have you had leaks in the roof?
• Do you experience shortness of breath?
• Do you experience recurring sinus infections?
• Do you experience recurring bronchial infections and coughing?
• Do you have flu-like symptoms?
• Do you notice an increase of symptoms on rainy days?
• Do you have frequent headaches?
• Are you fatigued and have a skin rash?

If you answered yes to these questions, there’s a high chance of mould toxicity. In our next post, we cover the actions you can take to reduce your mould exposure. If after this, you are still suffering and your symptoms have not improved, there are a number of lab tests that can be done. Surviving Mould has a list of these tests.

Fighting Adrenal Fatigue – The Impact of Mould

So you’ve cleaned up your diet, reduced work stress and switched HIIT for yoga…but your adrenal fatigue still hasn’t improved. It might be time to look at your living conditions.

A clear link exists between mould exposure and autoimmune diseases. It’s been estimated that approximately 50% of illnesses are caused by exposure to mould and the toxins it secretes – mycotoxins.

Exposure to the mycotoxins can have significant impacts on your health, triggering or worsening inflammation. Symptoms of toxic mould exposure can include:

• Fatigue and weakness
• Anxiety
• Brain fog
• Highly sensitive emotions
• Regular sinus problems
• Brain fog
• The feeling of being hung over all the time
• Headaches
• Light sensitivity
• Tingling and numbness of the skin
• Increased urination
• Vertigo
• Reduced memory function

If you’re one of the 28% of people in the world who have a genetic susceptibility to mould, the impact of exposure can be dangerous, often leading to chronic inflammation and ill health.

In our next post, we’ll cover how to tell if you suffer from mould sensitivity and exposure.