3 Yoga Poses for Relaxation

Yoga Poses for Relaxation.png

It’s hard to relax in the modern, fast-paced world we live in. Unfortunately, constantly being on the go can leave us feeling drained and worn out. If you’re finding it hard to relax and can’t sit still enough to follow your guided meditation recording, why not try some yoga.

Yoga is an excellent way to unwind after a busy day, so we’ve compiled the top 3 yoga poses to help you relax.

  1. Tree Pose

The tree pose is a great way to ground yourself – because you have to focus on breathing and balancing on one leg, there’s no room for your mind to wander. It can also help you to centre your mind by focusing on a gazing point.

Instructions: img_0362

Start by standing with both feet together. Ground your balance by focusing on your gazing point, and as you take a deep breath in, carefully move your left foot up your right thigh. Focusing on your breathing, place the bottom of your right foot on your upper thigh, or if your joints are sore, place it on your calf. Be careful not to push your weight into your knee as this can cause injury.

Once your foot is in place, and you’re balanced, bring your hands together in front of your heart in a prayer position.

As you focus on your gazing point, feel your breath slide down to your navel and then slide up as you exhale. Repeat the deep breathing until you feel grounded. Repeat with your other side.

  1. Extended Puppy Pose

This pose helps to lengthen the spine and calm the mind (which is important after a long day, and especially if you work a desk job). It also helps with grounding.

Instructions: img_0379

Start by kneeling on a yoga mat or comfy floor. Focusing on deep breathing, walk your hands out so that you are on all fours. As you exhale, move your buttocks back towards your heals and lower your forehead onto the ground. Relax your neck, but make sure to keep a slight curve in your lower back. To stretch your spine, press your hands into the ground and stretch through the arms as you pull your hips back toward your heels.

Breathe into your abdomen and focus on lengthening your spine in both directions. Hold the pose for 30 seconds to a minute. As you exhale, release your buttocks down onto your heels.

  1. Corpse Pose

Like the other two poses, the corpse pose helps to relax and ground your whole body. It’s also a really good pose to do before bed.

Instructions:img_0374

Start by laying down on your back on a yoga mat or comfy floor. As you focus on breathing deeply into your stomach, align your body to make sure both sides of your body are resting evenly and your shoulders are relaxed.

As you inhale, close your eyes and picture your muscles and bones relaxing into the floor. Image your body is being absorbed by the floor and spreading out like a puddle of water.

Working from the soles of your feet all the way up to the crown of your head, consciously imaging every body part, muscle, organ and cell relaxing. As your internal mental chatter starts to quiet down, fill your mind and body with peace.

Stay in the corpse pose for 5 minutes. To exit the pose, exhale and roll gently onto your right side. Take 3 deep breaths on your side. As you exhale again, press your hands against the floor and lift your torso up, dragging your head slowly after.

7 Reasons to Avoid Coffee

We all like (like, or have to?!?!) start our day with a coffee. Unfortunately, this habit of ours might be causing some damage to our health (especially if you are sensitive to caffeine). Here are seven reasons we are avoiding coffee.

coffee beans

1. It wreaks havoc with your gut

As you know, we’re firm believers in the saying ‘health starts in the gut’. And a healthy gut is dependent on its acidic level. Changes in gut acidity can be caused by coffee (among other things). Your stomach creates hydrochloric acid, which is essential for digestion. However, if hydrochloric acid is chronically over-produced (i.e. from drinking too much coffee) it can eventually reduce the body’s ability to create it, resulting in low stomach acid. If you have read our previous posts on low stomach acid, you would know that low stomach acid means poor digestion and malabsorption of protein and minerals.

2. It impacts your thyroid meds

The standard drug treatment for hypothyroidism, L-Thyroxine, is absorbed in the gastro-intestinal tract. Studies have shown that drinking coffee shortly after taking your thyroid medication can lower the absorption of it. This means that even if you have been prescribed the optimal amount for your health, your body might not be receiving the optimal amount.

3. It can expose you to BPA

The plastic lids on takeaway coffee cups contain BPA. BPA is a chemical which binds to hormone receptors and impairs all kinds of endocrine functions, hence the name endocrine disruptor (read more about endocrine disruptors here). When you drink your hot coffee through the plastic lid, BPA leaches out of the plastic.

4. It boosts stress hormones

When we enter our fight or flight mode, our body releases cortisol to combat the stress we are occurring. If the stress is acute, our body returns to normal once the stressor has passed. However, if the stress becomes chronic, as it can with drinking coffee regularly, our body is continually exposed to high levels of cortisol. High levels of cortisol can result in compromised immune function, among other things.

5. It can worsen Th-2 dominant illnesses

All illnesses are either Th-1 or Th-2 dominant. In a healthy person, with an optimal functioning immune system, T-helper Cells (Th) 1 and 2 recognise foreign toxins and signal to hormonal messenger proteins to go to the source of the inflammation and reduce the inflammation, working together to make your body healthy again. However, if you suffer from an autoimmune disease, drinking coffee can interact with your Th-1 and Th-2 and affect their function.

6. It can ruin your blood sugar

Caffeine impairs your reaction to insulin. One or two coffees a day is unlikely to affect blood sugar levels significantly in healthy people. However, for us who suffer from autoimmune diseases, drinking coffee can lead to both blood glucose and insulin spikes after meals. The more coffee you drink, the more your insulin sensitivity is reduced. This makes it harder for the body to respond to blood glucose spikes when they occur.

7. It disrupts your sleep

If you read our series of posts about copper toxicity, you would know that last year I didn’t sleep. At all. Unfortunately, it is when we are sleeping that our body repairs all of the cell damage that occurred during the day. For us suffering from an autoimmune disease, our sleep is hampered at the best of times and drinking coffee can just exacerbate the problem.

Copper Toxicity and Adrenal Fatigue

Copper and Adrenal Fatigue (AF) are deeply intertwined. Even a slight imbalance in the copper to zinc ratio can set up a positive feedback loop between copper, stress and AF.

Using technical, scientific language:

Zinc is required for the production of adrenal cortical hormones. Therefore, if zinc levels are too low, or copper levels too high, the production of these hormones decreases – and quite rapidly!

Copper is needed for our body to form ATP (aka energy). However, in order to do so, it has to bind to either metallothionein or ceruloplasmin. These two substance though, are only produced when our adrenals send a signal to our liver to do so. When our adrenals aren’t working properly (in the case of AF), they get a little bit slack (slackness depending on your stage of AF) and don’t do their job. Consequently, instead of being used by the body, copper accumulates in the blood and/or tissue.

But copper stimulates our nervous system and brain function increasing the response of our fight-or-flight mode. As we become more sensitive to stress we lose zinc quickly and our adrenal glands become even more depleted. But as our adrenal glands become more depleted less copper is utilised, perpetuating the problem!!

Furthermore, excess copper impacts the functioning of our liver causing it to not be able to produce the copper binding substances. When these aren’t produced, we have trouble forming ATP and fatigue entails.

If that got a bit confusing, here is a diagram to show the feedback loop between copper toxicity and adrenal fatigue.

Copper Toxicity and Adrenal Fatigue

Copper&AF

 

Relax with this one easy exercise

Deep-Breath-Relax

It’s that time of year again – Christmas! And while it can be a magical time of year filled with excitement, family and anticipation for what Santa might bring, it can also be a time of stress.

It’s less than a week until Christmas; how are you feeling? Do you feel like you’re running out of time? You still haven’t organised the dinner menu for the big day? You haven’t had a chance to buy everyone’s gifts yet? Has your ‘favourite’ (cue sarcasm) uncle just told you his extended family will also be coming to yours for lunch? Do you just feel like there is no time for you?

Did you know, stress has been linked to a myriad of health issues, including insomnia, depression, high blood pressure and mild cognitive impairment (MCI – a precursor to Alzheimer’s)?

Unfortunately, our typical way of relaxing (e.g. zoning out in front of the TV or tucking into a big bowl of comfort food – pasta, chocolate or ice-cream? or maybe all three anyone?) is doing little to reduce the damaging effects of stress.

What really helps – and only needs to take 5 mins – are deep breathing exercises. And bonus: it’s free and can be done anywhere, anytime!

Deep breathing increases the supply of oxygen to your brain and stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, promoting a state of calmness. Breathing techniques help you feel connected to your body—bringing your awareness away from the worries in your head, quieting your mind and letting you focus on the now.

So how do you relax through deep breathing?

Visualisation combined with deep breathing is a powerful tool to halt stress in its track. You can do this exercise anywhere, but we really like to do it laying down (and, maybe a little bit over the top, but with our feet facing in the direction of a window or door – read on to see why). release stress breathing

(1) To start, imagine all of the tension in your shoulders floating away.

(2) Now imagine two holes in the soles – one in each.

(3) Take a deep breath. As you do so, visualize hot air flowing through these holes moving slowly up your legs, through your abdomen and filling your lungs.

(4) As the hot air moves through your body, relax each muscle it ‘touches’ (e.g. as you visual the air moving up through your shins, visualise your calf muscles relaxing).

(5) Now, as you exhale, reverse the flow of the hot hair – you should be visualising the hot air moving down through your body and exiting (taking with it the tension in your body) the holes in the soles of your feet (and, if like us, you have your feet facing a window or door, you can take it a step further and imagine the tension and stress flowing out of the window or door).

The best part about this exercise is that you can do it anytime you feel like you need to relax and calm down…even in the middle of that shopping mall as you rush around buying last minute gifts (because, let’s face it, everyone else is too stressed also trying to buy those last minute gifts that they won’t even notice).

 

Thanks for reading. We will be having a break from posting over the Christmas holidays but will be back in the New Year to continue to help you with your health! Merry Christmas – may Santa bring you health, happiness and lots and lots of gifts!

 

The 4 Stages of Adrenal Fatigue

4 stages of adrenal fatigue

Adrenal Fatigue (AF) – sounds like a self-explanatory illness right? It’s when your adrenals become fatigued? Well yes, but it is also a lot more complex and debilitating than it sounds (as we’re sure you know if you are reading this)!

The interconnectivity and complexity of AF lead to an elaborate picture of conflicting symptoms that seem to defy conventional medicine logic – in one blood test your DHEA levels are elevated, in the next they are depleted. It seems like our body is having an ad-hoc response, but that’s not the case, it may seem like this because our medical understanding of AF is still in its infancy. (Who even knew there were 4 stages of AF anyway? We sure didn’t until we did some in depth research!).

In order to help you sift through the piles and piles of information on the internet about AF, we’ve used this post to compile a list of the 4 stages of AF and their symptoms. These are the common symptoms sufferers experience – because our bodies like to throw us curveballs now and again, you might be also experiencing different symptoms so it is important to seek out advice from an AF specialist to help with your recovery.

Stage 1 – The Alarm Phase

This is our body’s fight or flight response to a stressor. In order to manage this stress, our body launches an anti-stress response by increasing the production of the anti-stress hormone cortisol. During Stage 1 of AF, our body is quite capable in responding to this new stressor and usually produces a more than adequate response to it. During this phase, your blood test results might show:

  • Elevated cortisol, Insulin and DHEA levels, as well as
  • Increased blood sugar levels.

During this stage of AF, the fatigue experienced is quite mild and if noticeable, tends to strike around waking and/or mid-afternoon (and sometimes we just write that feeling off as not having a good night’s sleep or having a busy day at work).

As we continue to be exposed to this new stressor, cortisol levels remain elevated and we start to look for stimulants (e.g. coffee to wake us up and that 3pm choc chip cookie for energy). As higher insulin levels continue, our pancreas has to work harder and our blood sugar levels get further out of whack.

If we continue in this stage for longer periods of time we begin to experience a redistribution of fat from our bum and thighs to around our bellies.

Stage 2 – Resistance Response

With continued stress our adrenal glands realise they can’t tackle this problem by themselves and call on our hormones and neurotransmitters to help.

In this stage, the body will start to shift its supply of hormone precursor material from hormone production to cortisol production. If this stage of AF is not treated it can lead to long term hormonal imbalances and problems. Stages of adrenal fatigue

During this stage, your blood test results might show:

Despite a full night’s rest, in this stage of AF you probably wake up tired and not feeling refreshed. During stage 2 you might experience the following symptoms:

  • Anxiety,
  • Irritability,
  • Insomnia (it becomes harder to fall asleep and you begin to wake up more and more throughout the night),
  • Feeling sub-optimal,
  • Infections occurring more often as the immune system weakens,
  • Dehydration,
  • Low blood pressure,
  • Loss of libido,
  • PMS and menstrual irregularities, and
  • Symptoms suggestive of hypothyroidism – It’s during this stage that the thyroid gland starts to be affected. Sluggishness, feeling cold, and weight gain, despite exercise and diet, are predominant symptoms.

Stage 3 – Adrenal Exhaustion

As the name suggests, after continuous exposure to stress, the adrenal glands have become exhausted, unable to keep up with the ever increasing demand for cortisol production needed to overcome the stress.

The body enters this stage with the objective of conserving energy in order to survive. Systematically, the body goes into slow-down mode. In order to produce energy, the body will begin to break down muscle tissue, resulting in the breakdown of muscles and protein wastage.

Common symptoms of this stage are much more prevalent, including:

  • Exercise or general activity intolerance,
  • Extreme sensitivities to food you were once able to eat without problem,
  • Chronic fibromyalgia,
  • Brain fog,
  • Significant Insomnia,
  • Severe and constant depression.

As stage 3 progresses, metabolic, immunological and neurological organ systems dysfunction characteristic of Stage 2 become chronic. This is evidenced by multiple endocrine axis dysfunctions, including the ovarian-adrenal-thyroid axis imbalance in females and adrenal-thyroid axis imbalance in males. When these axis become imbalanced women may experience amenorrhea (loss of periods) and their fertility may become compromised (you could look at it as the body’s way of saying that it is not healthy enough to sustain a pregnancy).

As this stage progresses, the body slows down even further. The body’s pool of hormones eventually fall to levels too low to prime the adrenals and without sufficient levels of hormones, the body goes into a full-blown shut down mode. In this mode, the body tries to stop as much of the non-essential functions as possible to conserve energy in order to survive. Libido is suppressed, digestion slows down and metabolic rate declines to conserve body weight. Generally, at this stage of AF you are not able to work, predominantly bed ridden and requiring multiple naps throughout the day.

Stage 4 – Adrenal Failure

This is not a stage you want to come anywhere close to. This is the stage where the body has done everything it can in order to survive but is still being faced with significant stress that it cannot overcome. In this stage of AF there is a serious chance of cardiovascular collapse and death.

Symptoms of this stage include:

  • Sudden, penetrating pain in the lower back, abdomen or legs,
  • Severe vomiting and diarrhea,
  • Dehydration,
  • Low blood pressure, and
  • Loss of consciousness.

Given you are reading this post, the chance of you reaching stage 4 AF is probably pretty slim – you are doing everything you can to help your recovery. We hope that this blog post has shed some light on the types of symptoms you might experience during each of the stages (because as you know, they can often become blurred). Our next post will discuss recovery techniques for each of the 4 stages.

The 4 Stages of Adrenal Fatigue – Recovery Plan

Adrenal Fatigue Recovery

Are you tired, run down, gaining weight and feeling less than optimal? Have you read our post The 4 Stages of Adrenal Fatigue and recognised a cluster of symptoms that you are experiencing? Or have you just been diagnosed with Adrenal Fatigue? Well if you answered yes to any (or all) of these questions then you have come to the right place!

This post is about what methods and techniques you can use to help recover from the 4 different stages of Adrenal Fatigue. We tend to focus on Stage 1 and Stage 2 recovery techniques as these are the ones you are most likely able to recover from with minimal help from Nutritional Doctors and Adrenal Fatigue Specialists.

Stage 1 – The Alarm Phase

This is the first stage of AF and generally occurs without being noticed. Recovery from this phase of AF is often quick and can come from a good night’s sleep and reducing the amount of activity undertaken.

Examples of techniques you could use to reduce the amount of stress you face in everyday life might include:

  • Writing in a journal – there are 2 options here (1) each morning when you wake up, write down what it is you want to achieve, breaking each task down into measurable, quantifiable goals so you know exactly what it is you ‘need’ to get done and (2) each night when you get home or before you go to bed, write down how your day went, use this time to write about what has been stressing you out and how you can do something to remove or reduce that stress (for example you are stressed you can’t cook a healthy dinner for your family when you get home from a long day at work – take some time on the weekend for meal prep, that way when you get home everything is ready to go). Meditation_and_Autoimmune
  • Meditation – practicing mindful meditation throughout the day can help you manage stress levels. Take 5 mins in the morning, during your lunch break or at night to sit calmly in a quite spot and focus on deep breathing. We also like to use guided meditation to help calm our minds.
  • Reduce the amount of exercise you are doing – whilst we recommend getting in 10,000 steps a day, pushing yourself to the limit through long, intense workouts at the gym is not necessary.
  • Refresh your diet – there is no place in your diet for sugary drinks and processed foods. If you are eating these types of foods it is time to re-evaluate your diet and focus on fresh, wholesome foods.
  • Listening to your body – tired at 8.30pm, go to bed. Believe it or not, our bodies are pretty good at telling us what we need…we just have to listen!

Stage 2 – Resistance Response

Once Stage 1 AF has progressed to Stage 2 it is going to take longer to recover. During this phase it is important to put into action the stress-reducing techniques we talk about in Stage 1. It is also important to really focus on “constructive rest”.

“Constructive rest” is taking time out for yourself to rest and recoup. This might be taking more time to focus on meditation and breathing exercises, taking a nap during the day and going to bed earlier.

During this stage of AF it is important to reduce the amount of exercise you are doing and substitute intense workouts for more adrenally restorative exercises such as yoga and tai chi. As a rule of thumb, the more adrenally fatigued a person is, the more gentle the exercise needs to be. Exercising too much can push someone further down the AF spectrum. The timing of your workout also plays a part in your recovery – working out after 6pm can impact the production of epinephrine and norepinephrine, messing with your ability to wind down and fall asleep.

A focus on diet and lifestyle factors during this stage is imperative. For more information on what to eat for AF, what not to eat for AF and how to eat for AF, check out our other blog posts.

We also highly recommend seeing an Adrenal Fatigue specialist when you are trying to recover from Stage 2 (or Stage 3 and Stage 4) AF. They will be able to provide you with recovery advice tailored to your specific symptoms and requirements.

Stage 3 – Adrenal Exhaustion

Recover from Adrenal Fatigue

Recovery from Stage 3 needs to be taken extremely seriously. During this stage the body is beginning to shut down. Rest and lots of it is in order.

Holistic medical advice should be sought and generally supplementation needs to be used to provide the body with the nutrients and hormones it needs to recover.

Throughout Stage 3 of AF, exercise should really only consist of tai chi and walking. Any exercise that requires more energy than walking is using up energy that could be used for recovery.

Generally in Stage 3 AF our bodies can hardly function so it is unlikely you would be able to get out of bed to go to work anyway, but it would be recommended to take some time off work during this stage.

As with all stages of AF recovery, we should be giving our bodies less to do and giving it more time to rest and restore.

Stage 4 – Adrenal Failure

Go to hospital immediately.

When recovering from AF it is important to remember that it will take some time – we didn’t get to this stage overnight. It is common for AF recovery to take 3 – 6 months, and even longer for those in the later stages of the illness (or for those suffering from other illnesses). Be patient – and if you are sick and tired of being sick and tired, just think, these months of recovery is time for you to focus on yourself and put yourself first.

 

Review: The Adrenal Fatigue Solution – How to regain your vitality and restore your energy levels

Fawne Hansen’s The Adrenal Fatigue Solution is a practical guide for healing adrenal fatigue. It is both easy to understand and extremely informative. It really is the perfect all-round guide to Adrenal Fatigue.

Fawne Hansen is a former Adrenal Fatigue sufferer who has spent a number of years researching this complex health issue. Fawne has extensive practical knowledge in the treatment of stress and fatigue and draws on personal strategies she has used throughout treating her own adrenal fatigue. Dr Eric Wood is a licensed Naturopathic doctor and co-writes The Adrenal Fatigue Solution with Fawne. Eric has significant experience in many different areas of Integrative and Mind and Body Medicine and has specialist training in the Adrenal Fatigue sphere.

AFSolutionReview

As you know, here at Healed by Bacon, we suffer from Adrenal Fatigue and whilst we blog about our journey to recovery, it is still ongoing. If only we had read Fawne’s book at the beginning – it would have saved us a huge amount of time researching and trying to find answers to why we were feeling this way.

The Adrenal Fatigue Solution provides the most detailed, holistic approach on the subject that we have come across so far. The book puts everything you need to know about Adrenal Fatigue in a clear, cohesive order that really helps you understand the complexity of the disease.

But whilst it is easy to understand, it is in no way simplistic. The Adrenal Fatigue Solution provides the right amount of information and detail you require to work out where you are on the Adrenal Fatigue spectrum and what processes are going on in your body. The emphasis on the fact that everyone’s suffering and healing process is different really demonstrates Fawne and Eric’s experience with the disease.

Unlike the mainstream medical treatment for Adrenal Fatigue we receive – “just take these pills and stress less” or “you are in the normal range, so nothing is wrong with you” (and that’s even if your doctor actually recognizes adrenal fatigue) – The Adrenal Fatigue Solution provides a detailed, holistic treatment plan. The guidelines make sense, but also provide the underlying reasons and our body’s reactions, as to how the treatments are beneficial. Fawne and Eric present case studies, questionnaires and  a comprehensive reference list to further your personal research on the topic.

The Adrenal Fatigue Solution also takes us through a biology lesson to understand what processes are driving our Adrenal Fatigue. Fawne and Eric explain that to understand the whole picture, we must first understand our bodies’ hormonal reactions to the stressors we face. But it doesn’t feel like you are reading a textbook – Fawne and Eric have a relaxed, humorous approach to educating us on such a complex problem.

The Adrenal Fatigue Solution really is the perfect source for understanding adrenal fatigue and how to recover from such a complex health issue. Check out The Adrenal Fatigue Solution here.